Michigan Caries Prevention Program

MICHIGAN PREVENTION PROGRAM

CARIES = bacterial disease that results in tooth decay.

Altarum Institute, in collaboration with Delta Dental of Michigan, the University of Michigan School of Dentistry, and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, is working to reduce the burden of childhood dental disease in Michigan.

3 years. SEPTEMBER 2014-SEPTEMBER 2017
$9.4 million Awarded by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation
Disclaimer: The project described was supported by Grant Number 1C1CMS331321 from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents of this publication are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its agencies.
1 million Michigan children Insured by Medicaid and MI Child

WHAT WE’RE DOING

Better Care. Better Health. Lower Cost.

two young children smiling

Identifying children in need of care

Delivering improved oral health screening tools, technical assistance, and training to providers.

young child receiving dental exam

Linking children to appropriate care providers

Utilizing existing state infrastructure to develop a public health tool that allows physicians to refer patients to the appropriate dental care provider.

interaction between dentist and child

Promoting evidence-based preventive care

Providing education to pediatricians, other primary care providers, and dentists to improve delivery of preventive oral health services, and using outreach and education to families to close the dental care awareness gap.

dentist reviewing dental X-ray

Managing and monitoring care

Developing a statewide quality monitoring system that will allow the state to monitor the program’s impact on health.

WHY ORAL HEALTH MATTERS

Despite being relatively inexpensive to prevent, dental disease is the most prevalent chronic health condition among children in the United States.1,2

In some areas of Michigan, 80% of children did not see a dentist in the past year.3,4

As much as 80% of tooth decay is experienced by only 20% of the population.5

1 in 7 elementary school children 6 to 12 years of age suffer from a toothache, which can negatively affect their concentration, school attendance, and academic achievement.6


PREVENTION NOW CAN SAVE MONEY LATER

Children who see a dentist by age 1 typically have dental costs 40% lower than those of children who don’t see a dentist in the first five years of life.7


Fluoride is proven to be successful in reducing dental decay among children and works to address decay in its earliest stages.8

Many emergency dental admissions become prolonged hospitalizations with significant costs.1,10

Untreated dental disease has broad impacts and can affect learning, speech development, nutritional intake, self-esteem, social development, and quality of life.2,9

Restoring cavities is costly, totaling more than $100 billion nationally in 2010.2

GET INVOLVED

DENTAL PROVIDERS

Pediatric dental care is integral for giving children a valuable foundation for a healthy life.

MEDICAL PROVIDERS

Medical providers are key partners in the effort to increase access to oral health care for children.

PARENTS & CAREGIVERS

Caring for young children’s teeth is an important part of keeping their bodies healthy—and it’s never too early to get started!

SCHOOLS & EARLY CHILDHOOD ORGANIZATIONS

Leveraging educators in teaching children about the importance of oral health can help to improve preventive behaviours and help children avoid developing dental decay and the consequent pain and missed time at school.

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FIND A DENTIST

All children and adolescents covered by Medicaid and MIChild have coverage for oral health services, including oral examinations, cleanings, preventive services (fluoride varnish, dental sealants), treatment, and restorative care.

Trying to find a dentist for your child? We can help. Simply click on the Delta Dental image below and you will be directed to the Delta Dental of Michigan website.

© 2016 Michigan Caries Prevention Program, an Altarum Institute program. Disclaimer: The project described was supported by Grant Number 1C1CMS331321 from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents of this publication are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its agencies.

References:

  1. Casamassimo, P. S., Thikkurissy, S., Edelstein, B. L., & Maiorini, E. (2009). Beyond the dmft: the human and economic cost of early childhood caries.
    Journal of the American Dental Association, 140, 650–657.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: Oral Health. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/doh.htm
  3. Clark, S., & Fontana, M. (2012). Oral health care for young children 0–5 years: A report for the early Childhood Investment Corporation.
  4. Finlayson, T., Siefert, K., Ismail, A., & Sohn, W. (2007). Psychosocial factors and early childhood caries among low-income African American children in Detroit. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 35(6), 439–448.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013). Oral health disparities. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/OralHealth/oral health disparities
  6. Lewis, C., & Stout, J. (2010). Toothache in U.S. Children. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 164, 1059–1063.
  7. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. (2010). AAPD encourages parents to “get it done in year one” for a lifetime of healthy smiles. Retrieved from
    http://www.aapd.org/aapd_encourages_parents_to_“get_it_done_in_year_one”_for_a_lifetime_of_healthy_smiles/
  8. Weintraub, J. A., Ramos-Gomez, F., Jue, B., Shain, S., Hoover, C. I., Featherstone, J. D. B., & Gansky, S. A. (2006). Fluoride varnish efficacy in preventing early childhood caries. Journal of Dental Research, 85(2), 172–176.
  9. U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2000). Oral health in America: a report of the Surgeon General―executive summary. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health.
  10. Pew Charitable Trusts, (2012). A Costly Dental Destination: Hospital Care Means States Pay Dearly. Pew Children's Dental Campaign, 1–24.